AGILE IN ACTION

Tag: big-visible-chart

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Track costs and benefits visibly together

Posted by Simon Baker
Have you noticed that costs and benefits are rarely seen together? I mean literally on the same page or board. Are we afraid of what the truth might tell us? I think this is the case when I've seen business sponsors protect initiatives dear to their heart. Also when product managers continue to add features to their product when user demand has already been satisfied. The blinkers are on. They pretend they can't see anything that might cause harm to their 'darlings'. If it can't be seen it doesn't exist, right?
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Friday, October 29, 2010

Stopping the line to run with zero known defects

Posted by Simon Baker
At the Agile Evangelists Meetup last night, I said something like “we run with no known defects”. Thank you to Rick Vugteveen for asking me to clarify this. When we discover a defect we take steps to fix it as quickly as possible. It's a take on the Lean manufacturing concept of stop the line. We do this in two ways.
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Thursday, August 19, 2010

Boards for a more user-focused discovery-oriented approach

Posted by Simon Baker
Backlog out. Mind-map in showing user activities and high-level tasks
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Monday, May 19, 2008

New board design

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Saturday, December 2, 2006

Running tested features

Ron Jeffries talks about running tested features . He's also recently blogged about it here and the original article is here . We're tracking running tested stories within each iteration.

Thursday, November 16, 2006

Drawing burn-up charts on overlays

Posted by Simon Baker
We now have 3 teams working on 3 product backlogs (all in the same bullpen ). And we've run out space. We don't have room for 2 additional whiteboards on which to draw their burn-up charts . So we improvised. We now draw each teams burn-up chart on a transparent overlay which is clipped to the whiteboard at the top. The axes are drawn on the whiteboard underneath, and everything pertaining to a project's iteration burn rate (tracked and target ideal pair days plus tracked and target number of running tested stories) is drawn onto the corresponding overlay.
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Sunday, October 1, 2006

Timeline retrospective

Posted by Simon Baker
Our last iteration was charged with frustration. This gave me an opportunity to try out a timeline activity that looked at events and emotions, instead of our usual iteration retrospective format. Our burn-up chart was used as the actual timeline. We placed each story card on it at a location corresponding to the day it landed in the done column on our planning board.
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Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Amusement at work playing the XP Game

Posted by Simon Baker
Sometimes it's amusing working where I'm working. People in the office seem to be genuinely intrigued by how we work, although they often look on perplexed. They ask lot's of questions, they survey our informative workspace and take the time to read our information radiators as they pass by. Occasionally, one person comes and stands outside our bullpen and gazes upon the hustle occurring within. It's great. I don't think they get Agile yet but they're interest encourages and motivates us. And what's gratifying is that they tell us how happy and impressed they are with the work we do. It's wonderful to feel valued and appreciated. And it's great that they see the business value being delivered.
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Wednesday, July 5, 2006

I'm burning up

Posted by Simon Baker
Some time back I talked about keeping progress visible using burn-down and burn-up charts. At the time I said:
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Saturday, February 4, 2006

Making the quality-factor visible

To deliver working increments of software, it's not enough to show all the tests passing. You also want to know that each user story has a production-quality implementation. This is why knowing when you're done on a user story includes a mental check of the design and all the code. Some teams at Thoughtworks use a single information radiator to convey both the functional completeness of a user story and its implementation quality. Using both dimensions of a whiteboard, the x-axis represents the functional completeness and the y-axis represents the implementation quality. The story cards being developed in an iteration are placed on the whiteboard. A card is moved to the right as it becomes more functionally complete, and moved upwards as its implementation quality improves. I plan to reconfigure the Current Iteration area of my planning board to be like this. Reference: Alistair Cockburn on Communicating, Cooperating Teams .